Dr. Michael Cox

Dr. Cox’s research is funded by the Terry Fox Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, the VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation and the Prostate Cancer Foundation of British Columbia. His work focuses on early genetic changes in prostate cells, how resulting tumor cells respond to growth factors in the presence or absence of testosterone and how these cellular changes allow prostate tumor cells to utilize these growth factors to aid development of testosterone independence. With colleagues at the Vancouver Prostate Centre and University of British Columbia, he is developing combinatorial antisense and small molecule drug strategies that decrease the responsiveness of tumor cells to growth factors and has shown that prostate cancer cells treated in this way are more sensitive to testosterone deprivation or treatment with other chemotherapies. These are first steps in developing effective treatments for patients with advanced prostate cancer.

 

Lab website: http://www.prostatecentre.com/about-us/people/dr-michael-cox

Email: mcox@prostatecentre.com

Dr. Mads Daugaard

Dr. Mads Daugaard is a molecular biologist specialized in tumour-associated stress signaling pathways and tumour targeting systems. Dr. Daugaard’s ongoing research focuses on molecular and biochemical events underlying T cell exclusion in tumors; chromatin context-dependent DNA repair; and development of resistance to chemotherapy. Another aspect of Dr. Daugaard’s research relates to discovery and development of novel tumour targeting systems based on parasite-derived recombinant proteins relevant for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer. Therapeutic development programs include CAR-T and bi-specific immunotherapies, targeted drug-delivery, and oncolytic virus systems. Diagnostic programs include molecular pathology, circulating tumor cells, and biomarker discovery in bodyfluids. 

Lab website: http://www.prostatecentre.com/about-us/people/dr-mads-daugaard 

Email: mdaugaard@prostatecentre.com

Dr. Connie Eaves

Experiments in this laboratory and elsewhere have established the existence in adults (both mouse and man) of primitive hematopoietic stem cells capable of permanently reconstituting the production of mature blood cells in marrow-ablated or suppressed recipients. A major part of our work continues to focus on the development, validation and use of quantitative assays that are specific for biologically distinct subsets of these stem cells using syngeneic (mouse-mouse) and xenogeneic (human-mouse) hosts. We have also identified a developmental “switch” that alters stem cell proliferation and self-renewal control in the post-natal period. We are now trying to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these causes of variable stem cell behavior using defined culture systems, gene transfer strategies, and genome-wide gene expression analyses. We have pioneered the development of quantitative assays for normal mouse and human breast epithelial stem cells and these are being used to identify their distinguishing features and growth regulation. Studies to adapt these methods for application to human breast cancer are underway. The objective is to provide a basis for analyzing molecular and genetic determinants of breast cancer at the level of the breast cancer stem cell and thereby develop more rational, patient-targeted therapies.

Lab website: http://www.terryfoxlab.ca/people-detail/connie-j-eaves/

Email: ceaves@bccrc.ca

Please reload

Next Page

Interdisciplinary Oncology Program

Faculty of Medicine

100-570 West 7th Avenue
Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4S6

© 2017 by Kent Chen, Louis-Alexandre Fournier, Ada Leung and Michelle Pewarchuk . Proudly created with Wix.com